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and democracy in the nation at the forthcoming election. with respect and democratic institutions. this is the crusade since he bought it. the hope that the forthcoming elections with this on to the aspirations of the people in poverty. and that the baby feet stay in particular and peaceful. i find quite accepted in. the she's scheduled to go to polls lunch and eat its mystical a tough call but the opposition alliance. and the base has been tipped by a series of being the sponsors have done since they can tell that to question i've seen come and see christine end up going to step down and kind of attire the nonpartisan can't eat the government. yes main opposition but that the on field bjp is that children and for the state elections by the link on this basis set out to those cuts that article the mode of being confident in the semifinals of the two thousand and fourteen june election. it is those stupid fights did the same people that included women to be a threat to the game changes. not a strong motive for this trip is good news the tom and amy richmond on coles boss few weeks
of south africa, black and white, would go to the polls in if first democratic election in that country, and elect mandela their president with 62% of the vote. mandela set about what to do what seemed to be an impossible task, stitching together these two people, one oppressed, degraded for years, the other a minority, fearing they would be completely disempowered. in his inaugural speech, mandela stressed it would not be that way. >> and i enter a covenant to build a society in which all south africans, both black and white, will be able to walk tall without any fear in their hearts. a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world. >> mandela would transfer power after a five-year term and live to become the founder of a new nation, the living embodiment of its highest aspirations. joining me now is rohid. i cannot imagine the mood in south africa at this moment. >> it's a strange mood and it's very early in the morning here. so it's difficult to gauge the mood across the country. but what i can say outside the home of nelson mandela in the suburbs of johannesburg is this huge cro
elected president of a free and democratic south africa, and that actually came to happen. how would you judge his handling the presidency as that first democratically elected president in south african history? >> i'm glad you said that because he was the first democratically elected president, not the first black president. he was that because everybody had the right to vote, including africa africans. i was born in 1952, so i have no memory of this speech in 1952, but i do remember as a student at stanford be being involved in the divestment movement, trying to make sure that southern africa would divest from the system and apartheid would be ended. that was continued when i went to law school in the '70s and continued into practice in the '80s when we had thousands of people protest during the reagan years. and it was people of every stripe, and his legacy is something that will have to last forever and i hope that we won't just simply honor him when his birthday comes up, but we should think about a global, a global remembrance of this day, of nelson mandela's birth, not his death b
in the first mixed race election in south africa's history, nelson mandela was elected president. >> today is a day like no other before it. >> reporter: we were the first to interview him on that first morning as president elect. mandela tempered south africa's joy when he said healing his country would take time. >> it cannot be done overnight. it is going to take a year, two years, even as much as five years. >> reporter: from enemy of the state to head of state, nelson mandela's walk to freedom became journey shared by his entire nation. >> i have never been so excited and hopeful in my life in south africa as i am now. >> reporter: years later, nelson mandela paid a return visit to his former prison cell. this time accompanied by president bill clinton who later presented him with the congressional gold medal. mandela stepped down as president in 1999, but he lived long enough to see the united states elect its own first black president. >> so help me god. >> reporter: and in 2011, he was paid a visit in south africa by first lady michelle obama who brought along first daughters sasha
temps a free man . then it was elected president of the anc in nineteen ninety one. he continued to negotiate the president of the butte occurred to seek an end to the country's racist goals. three men were wanted them to the price in nineteen ninety three. nope all. i didn't fight at all. when paul. it was. apartheid when he came to an end in nineteen ninety four when like some africans were down to play for the first time in the country's history the agency won the parliamentary elections and nelson mandela was elected president of south africa eyes before you. they would get involved. by the bottle all this time. you have shown such a crime patient to detonation. will be made this card. as a whole updated. from the rooftops free at last the june nineteen ninety nine off to just one presidential term councilman dan everett on from politics. he remained committed to promoting peace and justice. the counts against fifty thousand pre invasion of iraq. and what comes out of the team needs in two thousand and five he revealed to the that is eldest son had delayed if the disease. th
where he predicted in 1952 that he, nelson mandela, would be the first elected president of a free and democratic south africa and that actually came to happen. how would you judge his handling the presidency as that first democratically elected president in south african history? >> well, i'm glad you said that because he was the first democratically elected president of south africa, not the first black president. and he was that because for the first time everybody had a right to vote, including africans, and it made a big difference. i was born in 1952, so i have no memory of this speech in 1952 but i do remember as a student at stanford being involved in the divestment movement, trying to make sure that not just south africa but southern africa would divest from this system and apartheid would be ended. that was continued when i went to law school in the '70s and continued when i went to practice in the '80s when we had thousands of people involved in protests during the reagan era because of south africa and it was black, white, men, women, young, old of every political strip
, would go to the polls in the first democratic election in that country and elect mandela their president, with 62% of the national vote. mandela set about to do what at the time seemed an impossible task, stitching together these two people. one oppressed, degraded for years, the other now a minority and fearing they would be completely disempowered and the new republic would be dominated by vengeance and incrimination. in his inaugural speech, mandela stressed it would not be that way. >> and that what i build in a society, in which all south african, both black and white, will be able to walk tall without any fear in their hearts, assured of their right to human dig any. a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world. >> mandela would peacefully transfer power after a single five-year term and lived to become a wise older statesman, the founder of a new nation. joining me now from johannesburg, south africa, is roheed, correspondent for our sister nation. and i cannot imagine the mood in south africa at this moment. >> reporter: it's a strange mood, and it's very early in the morn
was lifted. that year he walked out a free man. mandela was elected president of the anc in 1991. he continued to negotiate with president f.w. de klerk to seek an end to the country's racist laws. both men were awarded the nobel peace prize in 1993. >> we can stop the forward movement of these forces in the country. inapartheid came to an end 1994 when black south africans were allowed to vote for the first time in the country's history. the anc won the harlem in three elections and nelson mandela was elected president of south africa. >> i stand before you filled with pride and joy. pride in the people of the country. determination -- enjoy that which you can loudly proclaim from the rooftops -- free at last. >> in june of 1999 after one presidential term, nelson mandela retired from politics but remained committed to promoting peace and justice. he spoke out against the 2003 invasion of iraq and work at -- for aids. on policy he revealed his son had died of the disease. the last three years were marked with hospitalizations as he struggled with respiratory problems. had a lung inf
later he was elected south africa's first president. let's examine the man behind the status. our first guest had a strong connection. his grandfather taught mandela and his grandmother visited the south african leader in prison. it's a pleasure to have you here. i know you are the headmaster of the groten school. i'm glad you took time on what must be a hard day, given the family connections you had and you know him yourself. >> thank you for having me, i'm honoured to be here and i thank groten school for allowing me to be here. the man would have loved that. >> tell me about your family and connections to nelson mandela. >> my grandfather taught nelson mandela in college in social anthropology. they belonged to the anc, the same organization. my grandmother was also a political leader within the anc. >> and your grandmother then also was close to him and visited him in prison, and nelson mandela wrote her. >> several times, and my grandmother would write back. she told me she wrote so many letters, some of which never reached him. a few made it all the way and she put them into a boo
peace prize in 1993. the following year in the first mixed race election in south africa's history, nelson mandela was elected president. >> today is the day like no other before it. >> reporter: we were the first to interview him on that first morning as president-elect. mandela tempered south africa's joy when he said healing his country would take time. >> it cannot be done overnight. it will take one year, two years, even as much as five years. >> reporter: from enemy of the state to head of state, nelson mandela's walk to freedom became a journey shared by his entire nation. >> i have never been so excited and hopeful in my life in south africa as i am now. >> reporter: years later nelson mandela paid a return visit to his former prison cell. this time accompanied by president bill clinton, who later presented him with a congressional gold medal. mandela stepped down as president in 1999, but he lived long enough to see america swear in its own first black president, and he was paid a visit many south africa by first lady michelle obama who brought along her daughters. nelson
elected president. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> don't call me. i'll call you. >> his magnetic sense of humor, mandela was loved by everyone from world leaders to celebrities. >> when he visited the u.s., aretha franklin sang to him. tonight she's with us sharing her special memories only on "night line". >> this special edition of night line will be back in 60 sec >> this is a special edition of "nightline" nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. >> good evening and thanks for joining us. nelson mandela's face is one of the most recognizable in the world. and tonight in south africa this symbol of racial equality died at the age of 95. from boxer to advocate, prisoner to peace prize winner, seemed mandela was always fighting for a cause greater than himself. it's clear that his legacy as a champion of human rights, equality and freedom will be forever etched in our minds and memories. >> like so many around the globe, i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. and so long as i live, i will do what i can to learn from h
mourners are gathering. they are celebrating the life of south africa's first democratically elected president. you looking at the scene. a man who became a towering symbol for civil rights for strength, for unity. >> days to come, we will bring you extensive coverage, detailed coverage of his life, president obama spoke about mandela minutes after his death was announced, here is what he said. >> we will not likely see the likes of nelson mandela again. so it falls to us to be the example he set, to make decisions guarded not by haste, but by love. never discount the difference that one person can make. strive for a future that is worthy of his sacrifice. >> . >> right now let's pause and give thanks the r the fact that nelson mandela lived, a pan who took history, in his hands. bent the arc of the moral universes towards justice, may god bless his memory, and keep him at peace. >> the president of the united states, again, live pictures in outside nelson mandela's home tonight, and here in new york, a live picture of the apollo theater, the same the venue in harlem, tonight the mar
was the first democratic election in south africa five years later. i was there when the country's black majority voted by the millions, waiting in lines that stretched from one horizon to the other. i saw first hand the devotion to democracy. it was the great legacy of the man who died today. president obama paid tribute to nelson mandela today. through his fierce dignity and unbending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others i moved all of us. he embodied the promise that human beings and countries can change for the better. his commitment to transfer power and reconcile those who jailed him set an example for all to aspire to, whether in the lives of nations or in our own personal lives. >>> i promised you the president of the united states. and he's here. let's play "hardball." >> it's my honor to introduce the president of the united states. [ applause ] >> well, thank you, mr. president. >> it's good to see you. >> so what brought you to "hardball"? >> american university. [cheers and applause] >> "hardball" was just an excuse to hang out with these fine, young p
africa held its first democratic election. that day nelson mandela cast the first vote of his life and was elected the president of south africa. >> today we're entering a new era for our country and its peop people. today we celebrate not the victory of the party but a victory for all the people of south africa. >> while mandela's presidency was only five years long, in that short time he managed to set south africa on a path to reconciliation, something that was deemed impossible only years before. but his legacy is not limited to one country on one continent. in concert with leaders including gandhi and martin luther king, mandela created a new template for leadership and a new model for peace in the world. indeed in the struggle for human rights mandela has been and still is a guiding light for the oppressed, forgotten and the lost. when i travel to the zimbabwe border as part of a human rights canal pain for children, young people were streaming across the border by hundreds. they were alone with nothing but the clothes on their backs and they were bound for south africa drive
and the other was the election in south africa five years later. i was there when the black majority voted by the millions, stretching from one horizon so the other. i saw firsthand the devotion to democracy and the great legacy of the man who died today. president obama paid tribute to nelson mandela today. through his fierce dignity, an unbending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others he transformed south africa and moved all of us. embodied the that countries can change for the better. his commitment for the power and reconcile with those who jailed him set an example for all humanity to aspire to, whether in the lives of nations or in our own personal lives. >>> i promised you the president of the united states, and he's here. let's play "hardball." ♪ >> it's my honor to introduce the president of the united states. >> hey. [ applause ] ♪ >> well, thank you, mr. president, and thank you, dr. neil kirk win is here, the president of the american university for having us here today. >> it's good to see you. >> so what brought you to "hardball"? >> american univers
mandela had been elected president the night before, and i had the honor of being the first western journalist that day to shake his hand and sit down and talk with him. mandela showed no bitterness or anger. he was famous for that. no thought of revenge when i asked him about his predecessor f.w. de klerk, he spoke only of reconciliation and working together. >> our relations with mr. de klerk are fairly good. and he is one of those republicans i hold in high regard. we have had some differences. we have quarreled. we have said cruel things against each other. but at the end of the day, we are able to shake hands and think of the interest of south africa. and he has had that experience which i have not had. and if my organization comes out with majority in the elections, i will have to depend very much on his support, his experience. >> what happens when nelson mandela has to use force against elements of south africa's black community? are you willing and able to take on the political pressures that will take place? >> i don't expect a government -- as well as governments would re
activism began in college. he was elected to the student council, but stepped down and joined a boycott over conditions at the school. he moved to johannesburg, studied law and joined the african national congress, a political and religious movement fighting segregation. it grew sharper when south africa elected a white government passing laws taking racism to the extreme. the resettlement of 3 million, deprives the right to vote and travel. stripping them of citizenship. nelson mandela was 30. he was convinced peaceful demonstrations would never be enough. he helped to form and one an amped guerilla movement. a campaign of bombings and sabotage in the '60s led to his arrest and prosecution along with others in the movement. convicted but spared a death sentence, nelson mandela would spend a quarter of a century, 27 years behind prison walls, 18 of them at the notorious robin island. outside the fight grew more fears. aggression and violence focussed the attention of the world on racism. nelson mandela became the most famous prisoner in the world. the powerful international condemnation
. but non-white people need add internal passport. papers please. at the end of world war ii, the election in south africa in 1948 unexpectedly brought to power a nationalist government on a platform they called apartness. in their language, it was pronounced apartheid. they started codifying immediately all the various ways that they could separate the population by race and treat people according to the ways that they thought the various races should be treated. in 1949, the prohibition of mixed marriages act which banned people of different races from getting married to each other, whether or not you got married, the immorality act of 1950 made sexual relations between different races a criminal act. also in 1950 the population registration act which made everyone in the country register by race and receive a racial classification, black, white, indian or colored. those were the four categorieca. and there were a million sub categories beneath those. not beneath white of course, white was just white. but for everybody else it could be a little more complicated. also in 1950, the group a
a democratic elected governor. how would you assess this week's signups, increased substantially. there seems to be a lot of interesting with a lot of people going to the sites. how would you assess this now that we're at the end of the week? >> i mean, it's been a great week for the aca, there's no question about it. the kinks appear to be out. we're not quite sure about the back end, but i think it looks pretty good. the kinks seem to be out of the system. more and more people driven to it. more and more people are signing up. and the sad part for the republicans is it's only going to get worse for them. it's only going to get better. as the kinks are totally smoothed out of the system, people will find this bill, they'll find it's like heaven. and for other people they're going to find they've got better plans and they've got the freedom to choose and they can compare and they can shop which we never had the ability to do in america. i think it's going to be more successful each month it passes. so the republicans better find another horse to ride, because they can't ride this one. >> you
cast their ballot in the first democratic election. this morning applause for the first black voter. mandela became the country's president, the first elected by all of its people. >> we are all south africans. we have had a good fight but now this is a time to heal the old wound and to build a new south africa. ♪ >> reporter: after ruling for five years, nelson mandela passed the torch to the next generation and became an elder statesman to the world, a fighter, a visionary. the voice of his people and more accomplished. >> abc news. >> today following his passing the new south african president, president zuma said our nation has lost its greatest son and our people have lost a father. >> a man whose fighting spirit was matched by his humility and compassion. few hew human beings present either one of those sides in the amount that he did and he had both. >> absolutely. [ dad ] ah! lily... she pretty much lives in her favorite princess dress. and she's not exactly tidy. even if she gets a stain she'll wear it for a week straight. so i use tide to get out those week old stains an
, please. passbook laws were not new. but at the end of world war two, the election brought to power that had run on a platform that they kaule apartness. the word apartness was pronounced apartheid. so when the so-called national party came to power, they started codifying all the various ways that they could separate the population by race. in 1949, the prohibition of mixed marriages act which banned people of different races from getting married to each other. whether or not you got married, the immorality act made sexual relations between different races a criminal act. the population registration act received an official classification. black, white, indian or colored. and then there were a million sub categories beneath those. white was just white, but, for everybody else, it could be a little complicated. >>> in 1950, the group areas act which geographically partitioned with the country arong racial lines. that one formed the basis for the state relocating people. in 1953, the jeer before the u.s. supreme court declared that separate educational facilities are unequal, south a
election, and not enough time worrying about the next generation. and you know, the solution to that is ultimately what was envisioned by our founders and what jack kennedy understood, as well. and that's the american people. you know, we go through these periods where our politics gets all boll objectioned up. and sometimes we're nostalgic about the past. >> i am. >> i know you are. but the truth of the matter is, when you look at our history, there have been a lot of times when congress gets stuck. but we get through it. and the reason we get through it, ultimately, the american people have pretty good instincts. and if over and over again, they see that we're not addressing the core problems we have, eventually they will put in place folks who are serious about getting the work done. >> let's talk about the problem with the legislative branch. the other day, speaker boehner said that we can't get anything done because we have a divided country, a divided congress. but that's the nature of america. they have an aisle down the middle of the senate, down the middle of the hou
policy of apartheid. on to become the country's first truly democratically elected leader. >> i, nelson mandela, do hereby to be faithful to the republic of south africa. a born in a small village to local chief, mandela was one of 13 children and the first member of his family to attend school. in the 1940's, he began opposing minority's policy of apartheid laws that segregated society. first, mandela was inspired by approach of nonviolent resistance. as white south africa became more aggressive, so did he. as the head of the armed wing of the african national congress, mandela led violent sabotage attacks and was arrested and in 1962. he would spend 27 years in jail. he was never forgotten. eventually, international and internal pressure led president klerk to announce apartheid would be dismantled and mandela would walk free. rather than seek richer view showing, nelson mandela reached oppressors.ormer he tried to heal a divided nation. and the clerk -- de klerk shared the nobel peace prize. >> in 1994, he voted for the with millions of his fellow black south africans. became a state
leaves behind. >> reporter: the so-called supercop is back in new york. the mayor elect named william braton the job he had under giuliani. >> this is a beacon of light for the rest of world. >> reporter: his record of cleaning up crime was what attracted the oakland officials, paying him $250,000 to tell them how to tackle crime here. a year-long contract job that ended a month ago. >> i think what bill did was that he came in and he watched how we were implementing different things, from time to time, our crime analysis. even though you can do the form of it, do you do the heart of it, try to predict where the crime will happen? having someone who is the nation's expert on him was really important, i think. >> reporter: a major strategy he pushed was breaking down the city into five districts, with police commanders tasked with building relationships and being responsible for the crimes in their communities. the mayor believes the strategy has worked to reduce the violence. >> reporter: in fact the mayor credits his ideas as well as other changes in the police department for the 25%
would wish that the president could do more to elect politicians that would actually do something on behalf of the 99%. he doesn't have that power. so i thinkit smart politics for him to raise a ruckus over this. the other side of the aisle has no interest in helping working class people whatsoever. we are living in the matrix. and instead of being a battery, they want to turn you into an overdrawn checking account. what it really comes down to, these are the real problems people care about. working class people don't care about the deficit, they don't care about ending abortion. they need a paycheck so they can support their family. and to listen to republican politicians and the talking heads at fox news bad mouth working class people, come on. we already know that the republican party is the party of mitt romney. could care less about anybody less than $250,000. for the president to come out and make this speech is extremely wise politics, because it's what people care about and that's how you win elections. >> he's got to stay on it. the democrats have got to stay on it. i thi
in 1993p. the following year in the first mixed race election in south africa's history nelson mandela was elected president. >> today is a day like no other before it. >> reporter: we were the first to interview him on that first morning as president elect. mandela tempered south africa's joy when he said healing his country would take time. >> it cannot be done overnight. it is going to take a year, two years, even as much as five years. so help me god. >> reporter: from enemy of the state to head of state, nelson mandela's walk to freedom became a journey shared by his entire nation. >> i have never been so excited and hopeful in my life in south africa as i am now. >> reporter: years later, nelson mandela paid a return visit to his former prison cell, this time accompanied by president bill clinton, who later presented him with the congressional gold medal. mandela stepped down as president in 1999, but he lived long enough to see the united states elect its own black president. >> so help me god. >> reporter: and in 2011 he was paid a visit in south africa by first lady michelle o
to unite the country. at our first meeting after he became president and i was elected leader of party in may 1994. he asked me to have breakfast in cape town, and he said, you know, toni, the opposition must hold up a mirror to the government. and we might not always like what we see in it, but that is a democracy. and he was pretty true to that. if you [ inaudible ] on certain toes of his organization, he was none too happy, but i think in the main he lived up to the ideals that he set out for the >> nelson mandela leaves a lasting legacy across the africa continent. let's hear from malcolm who has been speaking to a uganda journalist. >> we are outside of uganda's sports stadium. it was built in 1997 and it was named after nelson mandela. mandela visited uganda on several occasions, the first time was in 1990, just months after he had been released from prison. this man worked as a journalist in uganda for many years. >> it was euphoric. it was every single person in the country could tell that there was something in the country that had never been there before, that was nelson mand
, he belongs to the ages. >> as a newly elected senator in 2005, senator obama ma now president obama of course met with nelson mandela. in 2006, as a senator. barack obama went to south africa, he visited rock bib island, and then just last summer, he was in south africa unable to meet face to face with nelson mandela, because of the leaders ailing health. he did meet with his family, he came away very move bid the experience. another thing that president obama comes back to over and over again, if you look at the literature, what he has written and said about his relationship and now he looks up to him, the way he behaves when he was removed to prison, instead of retribution and revenge against those that held him captive, he embraced them. you know i am really struck by number of things -- especially african-americans and nelson mandela. and you can sort of feel it in the words of the president of the united states. s there a sense about the relationship that president obama has said with this man? >> well, i think in the brief time -- and they have only met once. but obviously the
to know who they are. they say it was a miracle they managed to pull off the '94 election because and you eluded to it, there was a lot of opposition from the freedom -- >> right, the zulu. >> and the whites, the awb and there was a big, big problem that could have exploded into -- >> a lot of people forgot that -- >> yeah, there was who ran ifpd and shootouts and gunfights. i remember going to a lot of anc funerals and ifc funerals -- >> very touch and go. >> given that election -- >> even in the month before, two months before i remember a huge gunfight in johannesburg. >> one of the things, anderson, we walked together on a long walk of freedom that ended at his inauguration. he wanted to do another book not so much from that period to the presidency but how close south africa came to a civil war. i have to say, i don't want to -- the smirks, the reputation of mr. declerk and formed a partnership and couldn't have done it without each other. mandela in conversations with me for "a long walk to freedom" did feel betrayed during the creation of the constitution and that famous scene when
, they were awarded the nobel peace prize. a year later he became south africa's first democratically elected president. >> it's time for the healing of the wounds. a society in which all south africans both black and white will be able to walk tall in a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world. >> as president, mandela worked to combat illiteracy and poverty. local elections were held and improvements were made. he served just one-year term and stepped down. throughout the remainder he met with world leaders and he was a order waed the presidential medal of freedom and was a tireless advocate for peace and charity and the fight against aids. president obama met mandela only once while he was a senator in 2005. as president mr. obama travelled to see the cell where mandela was held for nearly two decades. he described his relationship to the man he and many others affectionately called madiba. >> he is a personal hero and i don't think i am u meek in that regard. he's a hero for the world. >> back this south africa, the mood is part sadness, but part celebration. crowds gathered to r
. on february 11th, 1990. the world rejoiced. he worked with his former enemy to move toward free elections and the end of apartheid. he and frederik willem de klerk were jointly awarded the nobel peace prize in 1993 and the following year this, the world again looked on in wonder and joy as millions of black south africans lined up to vote for the first time. nelson mandela was elected president in a landslide. >> so help me god. >> reporter: a few months later at his inauguration attended by scores of world leaders, he declared a new era for his beloved country. >> never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another. >> reporter: terry moran, abc news. >> now what happens next is nelson mandela's body has already been moved to the hospital. he will be given a state funeral. not only that, but all of the flags will be at half staff until the funeral is over. there's a ten-day mourning period for south africans, which obviously starts now. >> just amazing. it's a life that goes beyond anything a book or hollywood could ever make up. truly
election. and mandela became south africa's first black president. >> we are all south africans. we have had a good fight. but now, this is a time to heal the old wounds and to build a new south africa. >> reporter: after ruling for five years -- >> africa. >> reporter: -- nelson mandela passed the torch to the next generation and became an elder statesman to the world. a fighter. a visionary. the voice of his people. and a moral compass for us all. >> i am the product of africa. and her long cherished dream, of a rebirth that can now be realized. so that all of her children may play in the sun. >> his life, dedicated to that dream. abc's christiane amanpour joins us now. you covered the struggle in south africa. his early days as president. one of the points you make, is he kept the country together in a time it could easily have been torn apart. >> absolutely. in fact, his people say that it is a miracle that they pulled off that first election. just as he came out of prison, there was still terrible violence from the apartheid, the zulus from the extremist white parties. there were ki
in order to ensure their participation in the elections and the inauguration ceremonies will now be resolved as a result of recent consultations. this would be a welcome demonstration by the private sector of its involvement in the beautiful future we are all trying to build. we have devoted time to a discussion of economic questions because they are fundamental to the realisation of the fundamental objectives of the reconstruction and development programme below i mention some of the work in which the relevant governments are already involved to translate these objectives into reality. the government will take steps to ensure the provision of clean water on the basis of the principle of water security for all and the introduction of proper sanitation sensitive to the protection of the environment. we are determined to address the dire housing shortage in a vigorous manner, acting together with the private sector and the communities in need of shelter. health also remains a fundamental building block of the humane society we are determined to create through the implementation of
africans that they could actually feel safe in the hands of the government they had just elected. it is impossible to exaggerate the extent to which he had to more political stature. everybody around him i think acknowledged that he was head and shoulders above them. there were rivalries but not about him. >> you were saying earlier about the memories of the day when he was released. i'm just wondering about the significance of that election when he became the first lack president of south africa. of thee your memories experience of that day? >> when all this was happening, i was young. , in fact.young i was too young to even vote when millions of south africans were bused in at a school. thet of people were wearing vivars and shouting " mandela." nelsonthe people that mandela was with him fighting for the liberation. there was a lot of nervousness. as much as people were shouting, there were a lot a police presence. people were worried about what was going to happen. what are we expecting for the next day. as you rightly say, a lot of people, not everyone was happy about the rel
leaders? >> way up at the top. if one had to elect a president of the world some years ago, who would have been elected? it would have been nelson mandela. surveys have been taken in different countries, denmark, germany, other parts of the world asking young people who are your heroes? and only one person who was a politician came out in the top 10. that was nelson mandela. the rest were all entertainers. they were singers, dancers, athletes, but nelson mandela was at the top. so he's up there with martin luther king and the other greats who fought against oppression in their own context. >> dr. middleman, thank you for coming in. >> thank you. >> we have much more on the life of nelson mandela at www.wusa9.com including some of his best quotes and a timeline of his 95 years. >>> a look at some of the other top stories from today inincludg a proposal to raise rates for some of you pepco customers out there. >> and that's not the only place you might be asked to pay a little more, how much metro's general a subaru... ...are the hands that do good things for the whole community: the roenvin
appreciate how fast that election has moved forward. the testimony has spoken of the urgency. i'm looking forward to future conversations with members of the board and this committee because this legislation is treating it's triage and treating those immediately impacted. we also need to do much more to control and regulate the kinds of speculation that is fueling those evictions. and we as a coalition of affordable housing organizations and advocates have some other suggestions as to what we can do as a city to prevent those evictions from happening in the first place. i should say mrs. lee is on her way in the bus but she hadn't made it here. thank you >> thank you. next speaker, please. >> good afternoon, supervisors. from san francisco apartment association. i want to thank you supervisor chiu and the rest of his sponsors. i think this election is a good piece of legislation to create an migration to a difficult problem. i want to encourage this to allow private owners to step in and help anti amending that law so we can help out where there are no fault evocation to help getting pe
the turbines of today... will power us all... into theuture. ♪ ♪ lou: the mayor elected ew york city today surprising a lot of people, naming bill bratton to be the city's next police commissioner, the 66-year-old bratton is a veteran law enforcement official who previously ran the nypd and resilient as demonstration and headed the police department's above los angeles and boston. a new poll from cnn showing support for stricter gun control is fading. just 49 percent now say they back restrictions to the second amendment down six points from the 55 percent who have said they back in control in january. but may be part of the reason that the new york mayor now michael bloomberg, you remember him, gun control group bears against illegal vans, surrendering extreme tactics to push can control. please take a look at their shocking new ad for portrayal of a potential school shooting nine days before the first anniversary of that age and connecticut school massacre. >> on december 14th we will have a moment of silence for newtown. but with 26 more schools shooting since that date, ask yourself, i
on a number of occasions, from the time he left prison to his election as south africa's president. she prepared this remembrance. >> to my generation, the onetha, nelson mandela was a towering man of myth and legend, of action and passion, of selfless sacrifice and before any of us dreamed he became the embodiment of a notorious decades long struggling against oppression, these were images from the book, mandela, the authorized portrait, helps tell the story of mandela's long road to freedom,. >>> born in 1818 on -- 1918 ons, the legend was nurtured. spending some of the happiest years of his boyhood, this is a gentle place of rolling hills and farms, where children still play as he did. in times, they would call him madiba, his clan name for respect. here, boys even ones like mandela descended by royalty, were tradition that taught respect and responsibility for others. as mandela grew into manhood, the kosa mantle, deprived and demedian mandela and his fellow africans. in 1948, oppression was legalized into a system known as apartheid. as a young lawyer in the 1940s, mandela joined t
candidate who is electable. as chief political correspondent carl cameron reports, there are many democrats who say their party needs to adopt a corollary rule. nominate the most liberal candidate or risk losing relevance. >> reporter: unemployment has finally dipped, but wall street got a big bailout. most bush tax cuts remain and much of the obama agenda is stalled. progressives blame the president and weak party leadership. >> democrats didn't push hard enough to create an agenda that would put america back to work, rebuild our infrastructure, get us out of the wars, and to take us in a new direction on trade and push for civil liberties. >> reporter: but the think tank known as third wave ripped into far left economic pop ulists, warning in a hard-hitting op-ed that, nothing would be more disastrous for democrats. the political problems of liberal populism are bad enough. the movement relies on a, we can have it all fantasy. when the tea party pushed the gop right, democrats lost the house majority in the biggest blowout in 50 years. a coalition of 54 blue dog democrats saw their ranks
institutions and that's an early elections now. listening to much to report next. make sure the protests. he shifted the jewelry to ukraine hillary to the theories is the official slogan of the hardline nationalist movement known as the ukrainian insurgent army and it sounds heard among the crowds and tube these days. here's just a couple of these protesters to the dentist. mr next time people founder of the national assembly the party and the men inspired by the actions that the ui is wartime delicious we took a machine guns and fought the russians the germans and that you lose gold souk wanted to take away our ukrainian land. this is that the kaczynski and other party activist radical nationalists but scout movement. we need school. to maintain an organization not cause conte exist without wool. protest is one of those suspected of arranging the bulldozer action team over the weekend. both men represent the ultra nationalist sentiment is popped it in western ukraine which has traditionally gravitated towards europe rather than moscow. make it look like the european union until the end. eve
's cast their ballot in the first democratic election. >> this morning applause for the first black voter in history. >> reporter: mandela became the country's president, the first elected by all its people. >> we are all south africans. we have had a good fight, but now this is a time to heal the old wounds and to build a new south africa. >> reporter: after ruling for five years, nelson mandela passed the torch to the next generation and became an elder statesman to the world, a fighter, a visionary, the voice of his people and a moral compass for us all. >> a moral compass and robin roberts joins us. robin, you were there so many times, talked to his family members. >> several times, the first time ten years ago with my family. we actually went to robben island and stood in his cell and we couldn't father um what it must have been like for him to spend all of those years. on one of my trips talking to his second wife winnie in their home and talking with such passion about the early years and the struggle against apartheid and saying even then he had a bold vision and when i spoke to g
democrat exly elected black president. he chronicled end of apartheid and mandela's election and serving as african correspondent for the bbc. tom, thanks for joining us today with your thoughts. and what were they when you first got the news that mandela pass ad way? >> i had a lot of emotions both at a personal level and a professional one. i had the same feelings that everyone had, this was absolute titan of the global stage whose like we'll probably never see in our lifetimes again. these sort of men only only come around everyone hundred years or some i have memories when i met him during the time i was in south africa, particularly of his personal warmth and humor. i remember one joke he used to tell when a group of journalist west were gathered in his house and we were sitting talking to him before the interview and he joked about how when he was in jail and the antiapartheid protests started he was told by someone a lot of the kids in london when they were protesting believed that free was his first name because free nelson mandela was the postcard placard they were holding up. t
of the globe elections and mandela was elected south africa's first black president. but the true end to apartheid. i had a theory that the offer to suffer well dollars for profit. if i did. for many south africans and fellow will long be their memories and ninety that is traditional to me often used as a sign of affection. and for the world that he will remain in local icon for racially quality for centuries to come. ut on audience. and the entire world reacted to the news that nelson mandela is that global leaders were among the millions to send a condolence is recommended reports upon learning of them and those that really impressed and popped in and offer condolences privately calling him a great statesman well a global leaders were among the millions expensive or setback for the lay reader a moment stuns us was told by the u s security costs on friday only news of nelson mandela's passing. i'm profiling and seven. by the passing of this in mind then. this in mind that i was a triumph for trustees and the power for the german spanish. daniel rode the water one creepy introduced by
, he won the nobel peace prize. he became the first elected black president. once again, mandela has died at 95. we'll have more later in the show. meantime, our top tech story, twitter has added the first woman to their board effective immediately. she was ceo of pearson until last year. twitter faced controversy for not having a woman board member. she tweeted, "there could not be a more exciting time to join." john is in l.a. what is the latest? >> this was a priority to have a woman join the board. there are a number of things that made her the right candidate. she is smart and a forward thinking person. speaking with someone who worked with her, she pushed the envelope in the industry. the international experience and media experience is helpful for where twitter is now. there are certainly questions about twitter's business and she can help in those areas. and emily, you had that great interview on ipo day shedding light on this process. here is what he said to you on that day. >> it was very important to us not to ask someone to join the board and sign off of registration stat
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